CORE LABORATORY
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Leukocytosis

Leukocytosis refers to an increase in the total number of white blood cells (WBCs) due to any cause. From a practical standpoint, leukocytosis is traditionally classified according to the component of white cells that contribute to an increase in the total number of WBCs. Therefore, leukocytosis may be caused by an increase in neutrophil count (ie, neutrophilia), lymphocyte count (ie, lymphocytosis), monocyte count (ie, monocytosis), eosinophilic granulocyte count (ie, eosinophilia), basophilic granulocyte count (ie, basophilia), or immature cells (eg, blasts). A combination of any of the above may be involved.1

Eosinophilia

Eosinophilia is a higher than normal level of eosinophils. This condition most often indicates a parasitic infection, an allergic reaction or cancer. A count of more than 500 eosinophils per microliter of blood is generally considered eosinophilia in adults.
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Neutrophilic Leukocytosis

Neutrophilia refers to a higher than normal number of neutrophils. Neutrophilia may result from a shift of cells from the marginal to the circulating pool (shift neutrophilia) without an increase in the total blood granulocyte pool (TBGP) or from a true increase in TBGP size (true neutrophilia).
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Lymphocytosis

Lymphocytosis, or a high lymphocyte count, is an increase in white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are an important part of the immune system. They help fight off diseases, so it's normal to see a temporary rise in the number of lymphocytes after an infection.
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Monocytosis

Monocytosis is defined by an absolute monocyte count of greater than 500/µL and usually occurs in the setting of chronic inflammation resulting from infections like tuberculosis, syphilis, or subacute bacterial endocarditis, autoimmune or granulomatous disease, and sarcoidosis
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Basophilia

Basophilia is defined as an absolute increase in the number of basophils. Reference values vary from laboratory to laboratory, but an absolute count of basophils greater than 0.2 X 10^9/L is considered a true basophilia.
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1. Medscape. Leukocytosis. https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/956278-overview
Image source: American Society of Hematology http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/111/7/3908?sso-checked=true
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