CORE LABORATORY
Don't have an account? Sign Up

Platelet Disorders

Platelets are cell fragments that circulate in the bloodstream and help blood clot. Platelet disorders include an abnormal increase in platelets (essential thrombocythemia and reactive thrombocytosis), a decrease in platelets (thrombocytopenia) and a platelet dysfunction.1

 

Any of these conditions, even those in which platelets are increased, may cause defective formation of hemostatic plugs and bleeding. The risk of bleeding is inversely proportional to the platelet count and platelet function. When platelet function is reduced (eg, as a result of uremia or aspirin use), the risk of bleeding increases.1

Thrombocytopenia

Thrombocytopenia is a condition in which one has a low blood platelet count. Platelets (thrombocytes) are colorless blood cells that help blood clot. Platelets stop bleeding by clumping and forming plugs in blood vessel injuries. 
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN

Thrombocythemia and Thrombocytosis

The term "thrombocythemia" is preferred when the cause of a high platelet count isn't known. The condition sometimes is called primary or essential thrombocythemia. When another disease or condition causes a high platelet count, the term "thrombocytosis" is preferred.
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN

Disorders of Platelet Adhesion and Aggregation

Platelet adhesion to blood vessel walls is one of the crucial physiological events in thrombosis and hemostasis. An adhesion disorder is the result of the platelets not being able to stick to the wall of the damaged blood vessel to form a plug and stop the bleeding.
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN

Storage Pool Disorders

Storage pool disorders are a group of inherited disorders caused by abnormalities with platelet granules. Some storage pool deficiencies are caused by a lack of granules or their contents, but the most common ones are caused by a failure of the platelets to release their contents into the bloodstream.
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN

Disorders of platelet procoagulant activity (Scott Syndrome)

Scott syndrome is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by the loss of the capacity of platelets to externalize phosphatidylserine. Platelet count, size, adhesion, and aggregation activities are normal.
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN

Combined abnormalities of number and function

Some hereditary disorders of platelet production show low platelet counts and platelets of abnormal size. Many of these conditions are associated with other medical problems such as: May-Hegglin Anomaly, Alport Syndrome and Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.
ADD TO LEARNING PLAN
1. Merck Manual: Professional Version. Overview of Platelet Disorders. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/thrombocytopenia-and-platelet-dysfunction/overview-of-platelet-disorders
Image source: Alinity hq Casebook. Large Platelets and Increased Reticulated Platelets. 2019. ADD-00061876-v2. p.50
©2021 Abbott, Abbott Park, Illinois, U.S.A.

Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions

Unless otherwise specified, all product and service names appearing in this Internet site are trademarks owned by or licensed to Abbott, its subsidiaries or affiliates. No use of any Abbott trademark, trade name, or trade dress in this site may be made without the prior written authorization of Abbott, except to identify the product or services of the company.

All Alinity hq, CELL-DYN Ruby and CELL-DYN Sapphire instruments are Class I laser products. ACCELERATOR a3600 is a Class II laser product. 

The Alinity, ACCELERATOR and CELL-DYN systems are intended for performing in vitro diagnostic assays on samples of human origin (blood, urine). Read the instructions in the system manuals and labeling and/or reagent instructions carefully. Manufacturer or Authorized Representative: Abbott Germany.

Alinity h-series is available in select countries, not including the US.